After the end of the Cold War era, the world has ended multi-bloc division of nations and has become a global society. This created multi-dimensional threats and also introduced a new security concept. Terrorism, which has a very important place in the mentioned formations, has also become a global threat. Failing weak states have created a suitable environment for terrorist accommodation and have made the security concept vulnerable. Security is fueled by a combination of military, economic, environmental and human factors. Both national and international security are important in terms of unsuccesful states to maintain their assets. Terrorism and organized crime have become a great threat to a globalizing world by becoming a union. Global Teror and Security

KEY WORDS:

Terorism, Global Security

  1. INTRODUCTION:

The concept of security evolves according to political, military, economic, environmental factors, technology and other conditions. In this context, in addition to the geographical position and military possibilities of the country, its capacity, social, technological and scientific development level, supply security, especially energy and food, access to markets and economic power are becoming increasingly important. Especially globalization, outward opening, financial liberalization, increasing mutual economic dependence of countries,  gave rise to the importance of economical security after the post-Cold War globlization. The study is aimed at contributing to conceptualization efforts on the subject of increasing economic security. Today, the world, which has become a multidimensional global society, has no defined enemies and threats that are separated into specific blocks with thick lines. Rather, it appears that economic activity, technology, knowledge and human mobilization are faced with threats that become a multi-dimensional and complex structure as a result of globalization.

In this changing and differentiated perception of threat, terrorism, which is used as an implicit and asymmetric method of warfare, has become a global threat as a priority threat  which has more destructive effects with use of advanced technology. On the other hand, the fact that the global struggle over energy and water resources has become much more open and intense, the partition  of some states  and  change of regimes, or the abandonment of the regime weakened  them and has made the concept of security more vulnerable.

Therefore, the concept of security in our world, where conflicts of interests are intensely encountered by different political regimes, religions, economic systems and military forces, play an important role in determining the structure of the system in the field of international relations. In the international arena, this concept emerges as the primary purpose of states, with the main determinative role in the relations between nation states, and the maintenance of continuous security.

  1. SECURITY CONCEPT:

The root of security concept is “securitas” in Latin.  Literally, the meaning of security  is “the state and feeling of being away from fear and danger”.   Thinking about being psychologically secure is one of the most important elements of safety. The most important concept that this basic approach, which it has produced in Western social psychology and security literature and which is beginning to reflect on technical internal security practices, is “feeling of insecurity”. At present, many western security forces and public institutions are focusing on structuring and methods to satisfy the individual sense of insecurity and need in this framework. Determination of the needs arising in the field of security, measurement of satisfaction after the security practices and similar issues are realized by numerical measurement of the demand and satisfaction of the people and not solely by the decisions and approaches of security administrations.

In this context, recently observed uprise in international terrorism activities has had an effect on increasing the sense of insecurity among people. Therefore, the size of today’s security threat perceptions has increased on the negative side with the rapid development of international terrorism activities, which has led to the need to re-examine the security policies of states.

In the past, military aggression and even the threat of military aggression were believed to be the main concerns of national and international security. Today, with traditional threats remaining the same, international peace and security is no longer tied to military security, just as it was during the Cold War era.   However, it is argued today that human unity is connected to five main elements, and each element defines a focal point of security problem and a way to rank its priorities. These factors can not be isolated from each other, but they are inter-connected. It is possible to list these factors as military, economic, political, environmental and human factors.

Global developments in the 1990s required the redefinition of security. These developments require the definition of safety to be extended to include environmental and demographic issues. Indeed, some scientists have proposed an expanded concept of safety, including environmental hazards, AIDS, drugs and the like. Security is also central because States are considered as the basic unit in international relations. If a threat is an issue that concerns safety, the threat depends on the threat.

In today’s politics, threat perceptions of states have changed completely. Any element that is considered a threat to a state can be seen as an element that will serve its national interest beyond threatening the other. In general, threat perceptions of today’s world can be listed as follows.   The country’s economic, military, strategic and political weakness; history-based problems of history; land problems; the desire of minorities for independence and territorial claims; national and international terrorism; political, ideological, irregularities brought by religions and regimes; the presence of non-conventional weapons; destructive activities and threats for imperialism; how a nation that is exposed to the danger perceives it and the degree of density of the threat.

With the end of the Cold War and the subsequent September 11 attacks, it is now obvious that states will change their perception of threats nationally and globally, and that states will face much more complex security challenges than the earlier apparent Cold War era. Therefore, while states form their own national security policies that will serve their bachelors, they must assess all aspects of multi-dimensional security concepts in the light of globalization and the changing world balances. Concepts should be handled separately, resulting outcomes should be integrated with each other and their interactions evaluated in detail, flexible and variable policies should be followed. Multifaceted and inflexible policies, developed by ignoring the interactions of concepts with each other, can cause serious crises in states and in national and international politics.

Both national and international security are important in terms of enabling states to maintain their assets. In this context, it is clear that any kind of disruption of security will harm the governments and the stability of the world. Therefore, minimizing security problems has been a major day-to-day occupation of the states.

Undoubtedly, within the context of the circumstances of the international environment in the historical process and the reciprocal relations of the states, the understanding of security has caused the perception of different events as threats in the period. In this context, sometimes an invader attack like barbarians and sometimes a disease that can not be taken as a plague has been perceived as a threat to world security.

In our recent history, two global warfare threats to the global  security and a Cold War era in which security perceptions are shaped according to ideologies. In the process that continues with the end of the cold war period, the security concept has gained a whole new dimension.

In this process, at the beginning, the western world announced that the enemy was defeated by the end of the history, and announced that the world would now have a safer environment with the increase of economic globalization.   But in a short time it was understood that everything would not be rosy. Indeed, in the post-Cold War era, the world has experienced a period of turmoil and chaos, ethnic warfare along with ongoing events, the failure of some newly established states, international terrorism incidents and organized crime organizations have threatened world security as never before.

Thus, in the past, perceptions of new threats by states that perceived each other as threats differed greatly in the direction of the above-mentioned asymmetric threats. This naturally resulted in the questioning of the military power without responding to the threat and led the states to concentrate on the emerging forms of asymmetric threats. When the al-Qaeda organization was thought to have spent much less than the cost of a tank in the attack on the US September 11, 2001,   it would be much easier to understand the extent to which this new threat could reach and why the developed first-tier states especially concentrated on these new threats.

The failure of the state in this environment is seen now as a major threat to global security, especially for western developed states.   In unsuccessful states, state authorities and institutions have lost their effectiveness. Therefore, the state of authority that has come to fruition is filled with non-state actors.   The state of misfortune and chaos in unsuccessful states causes an atmosphere of constant conflict. The people are poor, hungry and miserable. Diseases caused by lack of care and bad living conditions cause thousands of people to die every day.   These negative conditions and the natural consequence of not fulfilling the basic needs of the people are the increasing incidents of violence. In this case, the people who live in weak states see it as the only way of salvation to change the existing system of terrorism and governance that the oppressed regard as weapons of the oppressed, resulting in the increasing amount of oppression and violence by the unsuccesful state governments of their own people.

Another important factor that fuels conflicts in weak states and affects national security in a negative way is the existence of strong informal groups outside of the administration structure in these states. These groups are based on local, religious, ethnic and kinship ties.   Often, either one of these groups is in power, or the leaders in the executive position have to privilege one or more of these groups in order to be able to sustain their assets. Therefore, these groups, which have the power, put pressure on different ethnic and religious structures. Resentments often turn into conflicts, which leads to an increase of insecurity in weak states.

On the other hand, as the authority of management in weak states weakens, people resort to various methods to meet their security needs. As a result, hidden historical issues based on ideological, religious, land that are not important in the past come into being. So when people in fear and anxiety understand that their potential opponents can not be controlled by the state authority, they embrace sila, and they start clashing with their neighbors and friends. The most important examples of this situation have lived in millions of lives in countries like Bosnia, Liberia, Somalia that have fallen into the unsuccessful state in recent years, and conflicts in such states.   In this context, the size of the issue of national security or insecurity in weak states will be better understood when it is thought that the number of people lost to civil war life in Congo since 1998 is three million.

Another important national security problem in unsuccessful states is the pressure that the administration imposes on the people to lose power, and in the failed states where the state authority is failing, streets and streets are under the control of murderers and criminals. Crimes such as drug and weapons smuggling have become commonplace and anarchy has become a law. Thus, in weak states, there is a complete chaos environment in terms of national security, and the people who try to survive on these conditions have to rely on strong people like warlords and tribal leaders to ensure their safety.

One of the most important national security problems of unsuccessful states is the existence of international terror and organized criminal organizations that can operate well in these countries. Their assets and activities undermine state authority, which is already weak in unsuccessful states, and it fuels the atmosphere of instability and insecurity in unsuccessful states.   Therefore, there is no law and order; it is unthinkable to meet the security need, which is one of the basic needs of people in such an uncertain environment where power is the law.

As a result, the concept of national security in weak states has left its place to the notion of national insecurity. It is impossible for the state to protect the country against the attack from the outside and to ensure the security of its own people.  Naturally, it is clear that the existence of such a state will also affect neighboring countries and regional security at the same time.

  1. UNSUCCESFUL (WEAK) STATE:

There is a possibility that conflicts that flourish in unsuccesful (weak) states will spread to neighboring countries.   It is a known fact that the neighbors of unsuccessful states are generally weak and fragile. These neighboring states have various problems, especially ethnic and religious reasons. For this reason, conflicts in unsuccessful states are affecting ethnic and religious groups and interests in neighboring countries, as well as in-state and non-state actors. In a weak state, a conflict of national nature is able to acquire a regional character in a short time by showing a trigger feature. As a matter of fact, this possibility has been realized in the Balkans in the past and still lives in the Caucasus today. Following the breakup of Yugoslavia, especially in the Balkans, ethnic conflicts that began in Kosovo have almost triggered a regional feature, spreading to Bosnia, Serbia and Croatia in a short period of time. Similarly, the civil war in Liberia caused the conflicts in Sierra Leone to accelerate, resulting in problems in the refugees trying to escape from Sierra Leone, and the conflicts in the Congo caused events and conflicts in Zimbabwe.

Another feature of unsuccesful states that impacts regional security is the refugee problem. People who flee from conflict and chaos in failed states often take refuge in neighboring countries, which often cause various economic and social problems for neighboring countries, which often feed their own people hard. In addition, some of the refugees remain stateless, never returning, and are a problem in every country they go to.

In unsuccessful states, terrorist activities such as money laundering, illicit drug trafficking, and arms trafficking carried out by organized and organized criminal organizations cause unfair competition and damage the global world economy, affecting globalization negatively.

When governments are weak, the breakdown of relations with state and international corporations, where they engage in economic and commercial agreements, is seen as another important threat to the globalizing world economy. Because in such a case, the states and businessmen investing in weak states are very damaging. Therefore, in order not to encounter such a risk again, they will be much more careful in the investments they will make in the future, which will have an effect in narrowing the expanding world economy.

The most important threat for unsuccessful states for globalization is the presence of instability and ambiguity in the specific regions of the world. However, the most important issue for developing globalization is to find stable environments.

  1. DEFINITION OF TERRORISM:

The word terror is based on the word “Terror” in Latin with its origins and is one of the most controversial concepts in the modern world, expressing the sense of trembling and fear.   Unfortunately, there is no definition accepted by everyone with the meaning that terrorism contains today. The main reason for this is that terror and terrorism are perceived in many different ways in the direction of changing political interests and aims. For this reason, a situation defined as a fight for freedom for somebody can be defined as terrorism for another.

Terrorism is a threat to the use or the use of violence, a strategy of struggle or a strategy adopted to achieve certain goals. The purpose of terrorism is to create a fear situation in the person who is being used violence. Terrorism is cruel and incompatible with humanitarian principles, trying to create reactions that are appropriate for their own ends by bringing a purpose to terrorism.

The definition of terrorism, whatever it is defined, has existed as a means of struggle from the very ancient times of terrorism. If the first examples are examined, it is possible to write a terrorist history that can reach up to the “Sicarii” organization which was in operation between the dates of A. D. 66-73.

The purpose of terrorism, which has its roots so far, has always been to fulfill requests or to meet political needs. In order to accomplish this aim, terrorist organizations have tried to give the message they want to people who have witnessed actions with the actions they have done or learned with the media. Thus, the fear of being the next victim in people’s minds was created and a state of horror and horror was created in the society, and the people and governments tried to be directed in accordance with the wishes and aims of the terrorist organizations. The concept of terror has evolved with the developing conditions and technology for this purpose which can be summarized as violent policy making, and over time, terror has become an international security problem from the problem of general irregularity and anarchy.

  1. INTERNATIONAL TERORIZM:

The concept of international terrorism is a concept that has gained importance in the developing world system, especially in the post-Cold War era. New opportunities created by globalization and developing technology in this period and organized organizing crime organizations in the same period have caused international terrorism to gain a global dimension. In the process, some terrorist organizations such as Al Qaeda have taken on the nature of organized crime, spreading like a network of spiders all over the world and gaining enough power to attack even the USA, the only super power of our time.

In this process, the organizational and organizational characteristics of organized crime organizations have set an example as a tool in the development of terrorism. Organized crime organizations are organizations that perform all kinds of illegal activity with specialized business logic. These organizations work like regional and global companies that provide customers access to raw materials from a product. In this context, drugs and weapons, such as weapons, spread to all world markets and provide the services they need to make use of terrorist organizations.

Organized crime organizations have found new possibilities, especially after 1980 and with the end of the Cold War, the destruction of the East Block, the removal of obstacles between the east and the west. In addition, the increase in global demand for drugs, the development of technology, the emergence of a new international environment resulting in globalization, these organizations have many possibilities. Organized criminal organizations, which have already been operating with an operational logic, have become globalized together with the globalization phenomenon and spread to the whole world, threatening the whole humanity with illegal activities.

The patrons of organized crime organizations are benefiting like businessmen operating in the legal framework provided by the free market economy. Illegal activities are carried out through over-the-counter organizations operating in the legal framework, thus being hidden from government control. At this point, terrorist organizations function as tongs that organize and provide the conditions of conflict that their criminal organizations need.

Organized criminal organizations that have carried out their activities in this way have formed a global network among them. The socio-economic structures in the national and international scale constitute the backbone of organized crime and nourish it. Organized crimes, while destroying the state, on the other hand exploiting the possibilities provided by the state. The funding obtained from illegal ways is used as a power element in the organization and guiding the political system, the press and the public administration in organized crime organizations. In addition, organize crime organizations are a big problem in terms of democracy because they are an illegal economic-political power center within the field of civil society. On the other hand, the fact that organizing criminal organizations become the center of economic power has created the possibility of directing the imbalance of forces within the democratic state of law, which makes it difficult for the democratic state of law to fight against them as seen in the case of Italy.

Organized crimes, as well as Western countries threaten established democracies from economic and political directions; it also poses a serious problem in terms of the countries trying to develop the democratic process and especially in the weak states. Economic interdependence between countries increases the scale of the problem. In other words, the activities carried out by organized crime organizations affect not only the countries where the activity is carried out but also many other countries, especially its neighbors.

Organized crime and terrorism are not two separate phenomena. Especially international terrorism and drug trafficking are two intertwined threats to international security. This problem, which has become global in today’s world, has continued to grow, despite some inadequate international agreements and various measures taken by the states, so organize criminal organizations have created a chain of “terrorism-drug trafficking-major mafia guilt” and this structure can develop in a short time and search for the environment he’s got the effort.

In this environment, terrorism and terrorist organizations are emerging as tools used by organized criminal organizations in illegal activities. Because such organizations can operate and operate more easily where there is a natural conflict environment. Because, if there is a conflict environment, the state control is reduced and the demand for organizing is increased.   On the other hand, international terrorist organizations can act just like organized criminal organizations or international companies. In other words, they have spread all over the world in the form of networks and thus the whole world has entered into the operation field of these organizations.

Madji Hasan Idris, a member of the Al Wa’d terrorist organization in Egypt, describes this structure as follows. Al Wa’d sends members of the novice organization to the camps in Kosovo and Pakistan. They are trained here. They are then sent to the Philippines, Kashmir or wherever they need to take action. In this process, members of the organization communicate with each other via satellite phones and the Internet. Requirements such as passports and airplane tickets can easily be obtained through the help of the big embassies in these countries, so that they can reach the possibility and capability of carrying out terrorist acts in any country of the world.

The most important difference that distinguishes organized terrorist or criminal organizations such as international terrorist organizations such as Al Qaeda and Al Qaeda or organized crime organizations such as Colombia or Italian mafia is that these organizations do not have a territorial goal or certain ideologies. In other words, these organizations define themselves universally. Therefore, with these features, international terrorist organizations are separated by certain lines from organizations with a certain public and limited targets such as IRA or PKK in the classical sense. For these organizations, the world is a battleground where they can achieve their goals.

Within this aim, the priority activities of the international terror organizations that have completed the establishment, structuring and goals are to search the states where they can perform their activities all over the world comfortably. Naturally, it is very difficult for such areas to be included in strong state systems. Because, in strong states, all organs of the state are active. Therefore, any international terrorist organization to be established in these states is likely to face an operational risk at any time. However, there is no tolerance for the risk of such an operation, especially at the initial stages of the construction, as the international terror organization has to inherit. Because such possible operations may cause international terrorist organizations to disappear from the beginning. Naturally, this is a risk that no terrorist organization can take advantage of.

For this reason, successful and powerful states are not organized for international terrorist organizations; but they are the area of operation, and these organizations prefer to have only co-ordination and small operation cells in successful states.

With the emergence of globalization after the Cold War, only trade technology and communication have not developed. Besides, international terrorism and organize crime organizations have become extraordinary and threatened to international security and stability.

The unsuccessful state question has taken the most important issue that threatens world security today, and it focuses on unsuccessful states that are of interest to the whole Western world, especially the United States.

It is interesting, however, that there is hardly any debate about the failure of state-based terrorism in Turkey. Because, terrorist attacks in connection with terrorist organizations hosted by weak states are taking place in Turkey. Finally, attacks on al Qaeda terrorist organization in Istanbul in 2003 are a good example. Terrorist attacks on Istanbul have shown that unsuccessful state-based terrorist activities will be one of the major threats to Turkey in the coming years. Therefore, the recognition of the concept of weak state and terrorism, the perception of the possible activities and possibilities of terrorist organizations that these states willingly or unintentionally supported, and the measures taken accordingly, gain importance in terms of the security of our country.

While global companies are seeking political and economic stability in the states they work with, international terrorist organizations, on the contrary, choose non-stable states. Because in such states there are no strong and qualified governments that will prevent the activities of these organizations. Thus, weak states provide these organizations with an environment in which they can act as they wish without risking any operation.

An important advantage provided by unsuccesful states to international terrorism and organized criminal organizations is undoubtedly the sovereign rights of these states. As a result, failed states are sovereign states and whatever they may be, no other state can enter these states and perform operations or other activities. Therefore, international terrorism and organize crime organizations are operating in other countries, inhabited by unsuccessful states, and the states which suffer damage from the activities of these organizations are unable to do any activities for these organizations due to the immunity of sovereignty of the concerned state. In this case, the damaged states can only warn the unsuccesful state, where international terrorism and organized criminal organizations are hosted. But for unsuccessful states, these warnings often do not make sense. This, therefore, creates an inexplicable environment for international terrorism and organized crime organizations.

The intervention of Afghanistan and Iraq in the framework of the US’s doctrine of preventive attack has given a new dimension to this problem. The US shooting of Afghanistan for al Qaeda has nothing more to do than let alone Al Qaeda from Afghanistan and settlement in Somalia, Indonesia, Chechnya, Bosnia, Lebanon and Kosovo. Because there is no state authority in these places, and Al Qaeda has gradually withdrawn from Afghanistan and has settled in these new weak states.

In an environment of asylum that is comfortable and sovereignty impunity in unsuccessful states, international terrorism and organized crime organizations are establishing their own organizations as they want. These organizations are able to do training, build weapons warehouses and perform their activities in such an environment.   In this context, international terrorism and organized criminal organizations can create territories under their own control in unsuccesful states. The Fergana Valley, located within the borders of Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, constitutes one of the most obvious examples of today. As a matter of fact, the Fergana valley has now become an alternative to the Bekaa valley in Lebanon and is entirely under the control of international terrorism and organized criminal organizations. Similarly, the village of Bocinja Donja in Bosnia has been used as the home of such organizations for years, and the terrorist organizations that easily coordinate their activities in these places have gained the opportunity to act in the place where the world wishes.

International terrorism and organizing criminal organizations provide the necessary funding for theft, money laundering, drugs, arms and organ trading activities and acts carried out in unsuccesful states. In addition, international terrorist organizations operate in some business areas for the possibility of income in weak states, such as the farming areas in Somalia where plantation-style chewing gum is produced, or the operation of some factories in Algeria are under the management of international terrorist organizations. It is also known that international terror and organized crime organizations use some unsuccesful states as a business and coordination center. Algeria as a center for drug trafficking, arms trade and money laundering in Africa is a good example of this situation and many international terrorist organizations are operating in Algeria, especially Al Qaeda.  Again, international terrorist organizations are able to obtain personnel from poor people living in failed states with very low wages, and they are able to obtain passports officially from these states and go to the country they want. For example, Al Qaeda international terrorist organization leader Bin Laden has been found to have passports in Algeria, Sudan and Bosnia.

Another possibility is that the terrorist organization is weapons. Unsuccessful state armies can legally buy guns from around the world. As a result, they are officially state. This creates new possibilities for international terrorism and organize criminal organizations. Because these organizations either agree with the members of the army in the weak states, they are able to buy weapons or steal them from the army repositories. For example, in 1997, thousands of weapons from Algeria’s army repositories could not be obtained and no information could be given about their fate.

International terrorism and organized criminal organizations, which have established deep-rooted relations with failed states, may even be able to become an alternative to the state authority in some cases. As a matter of fact, similar situations have been experienced in Sudan, Somalia and Afghanistan in recent years.  In other words, international terrorism with failed states and the association of organized crime organizations become a form of co-existence in time. Unsuccessful states are home to these organizations, and international terrorism and the existence of organizing criminal organizations cause unsuccessful state formation, which can lead to the collapse of states, leading to the degeneration of state institutions that are already inadequate in weak states. It is also known that international terror and organized crime organizations use some unsuccesful states as a business and coordination center. Algeria as a center for drug trafficking, arms trade and money laundering in Africa is a good example of this situation and many international terrorist organizations are operating in Algeria, especially Al Qaeda.  Again, international terrorist organizations are able to obtain personnel from poor people living in failed states with very low wages, and they are able to obtain passports officially from these states and go to the country they want. For example, Al Qaeda international terrorist organization leader Bin Laden has been found to have passports in Algeria, Sudan and Bosnia.

Another possibility is that the terrorist organization is weapons. Unsuccessful state armies can legally buy guns from around the world. As a result, they are officially state. This creates new possibilities for international terrorism and organize criminal organizations. Because these organizations either agree with the members of the army in the weak states, they are able to buy weapons or steal them from the army repositories. For example, in 1997, thousands of weapons from Algeria’s army repositories could not be obtained and no information could be given about their fate.

International terrorism and organized criminal organizations, which have established deep-rooted relations with failed states, may even be able to become an alternative to the state authority in some cases. As a matter of fact, similar situations have been experienced in Sudan, Somalia and Afghanistan in recent years.  In other words, international terrorism with failed states and the association of organized crime organizations become a form of co-existence in time. Unsuccessful states are home to these organizations, and international terrorism and the existence of organizing criminal organizations cause unsuccessful state formation, which can lead to the collapse of states, leading to the degeneration of state institutions that are already inadequate in weak states. Thus, international terrorism, organized crime, chaos, conflict, and a failed cycle of the state chain fail to come into being, this situation is becoming out of time.

Governments that are not democratic in the weak states, and often the rule of the leader, are another threat to international security. Because these administrations are unreliable and they can take any kind of risks if they are in the process of being able to supply and use weapons of mass destruction in the first place. The Iraqi example under the leadership of North Korea and Saddam Hussein is a good example of this.

There are three main threats from unsuccessful government. According to Mallaby, these threats are the ones who have migrated to western countries from unsuccessful states. According to Mallaby, these immigrants are a threat. Because these people do not get rid of their past in the new countries they come from, especially in the democratic environment of the western countries, they engage in illegal activities related to their own countries, which causes security problems in the countries that have immigrants from weak states.

According to Mallaby, the most important security threat from the failed state is the danger that the drugs produced in countries like Colombia and Afghanistan are produced for the health of the people of the world. In addition, Mallaby sees rapid population growth in unsuccesful states as a threat to world security and the sharing of scarce resources of the world. The last thing to focus on the adverse effects of weak states on international security is the existence of extreme radical trends in these countries. The feeling of weakness, helplessness and oppression among people living in unsuccessful states causes ethnic and religious radicalism. This is a real threat to humanity. Because people who have been living with this psychology for a long time are almost ready to explode and become a gunpowder, which creates a conflict environment and especially hostility towards the West.

CONCLUSION

It is not possible to say that no state and man are safe in the world where such an environment of tension exists.

As a result, it is possible to say that the relations of unsuccessful states with international terrorism and organizing criminal organizations become organic. This threatens international security and constitutes the most important problem of the modern world. The organic relations of unsuccessful states and international terror and organized crime organizations, which are common lives, are about to become a chronic problem nowadays. Indeed, as explained above, the attack on Afghanistan by the United States to destroy the al-Qaeda international terrorist network opens up the dimensions of this problem. Al Qaeda, the result of this attack, has not been destroyed, but has found only other weak states that are self-confident. The powerful states of the Western world, which are aware of this and are most affected by this situation, are trying to find solutions to the problem.

Especially, it is better understood that after 9/11 attacks, only happy and trouble free of a certain group of countries in the world can not provide an atmosphere of confidence.

 

Burhanettin Senli Ph. D

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